Account Login Canada Toll-Free: 1.800.561.1833 SK Toll-Free: 1.877.506.7456 Contact & Locations

Remind Me

Bill Richardson -- Book Launch

Thursday Nov 14 2019 7:00 pm, Winnipeg, Grant Park in the Atrium

Launch of I Saw Three Ships: West End Stories (Talonbooks) featuring actor/director Mariam Bernstein and a musical performance from singer/songwriter Connie Kaldor.

The eight linked stories in Bill Richardson’s I Saw Three Ships take their direction from the seasonal tug-of-war between expectation and disappointment that occurs as the light deepens. The pieces give shelter to characters whose experiences of transcendence leave them more alienated than consoled. These are quirky stories, sometimes twisted, sometimes tender, intended for anyone who’s ever been stuck with their wheels spinning at the corner of Pagan and Holy.

Bill Richardson, winner of the Stephen Leacock medal for humour and former CBC Radio personality, is the author of numerous books for both adults and children, including plays, poetry, and fiction.

Mariam Bernstein has been working as a Winnipeg based actor and director for over thirty years. A graduate of the National Theatre School of Canada and U of W, she has performed from Halifax to Victoria, and directed a wide variety of genres from New Music Chamber Opera to Shakespeare and new Canadian plays. A long standing fan of Bill Richardson's work, Mariam is delighted to be a part of this launch.

 

Folk legend and singer and songwriter and former Winnipegger Connie Kaldor returns to the city after touring in support of her new CD, Everyday Moments. Described by the Boston Globe as "a masterful performer, wildly funny one moment, deeply personal the next," Connie will perform new songs and old favourites and, yes, perhaps a Christmas tune or two.

See:

I Saw Three Ships

- by Bill Richardson

Trade paperback $16.95 - Add to Cart
Reader Reward Price: $15.26

The eight linked stories in Bill Richardson's I Saw Three Ships, set around Christmastime in Vancouver's beloved West End neighbourhood, take their direction from the seasonal tug-of-war between expectation and disappointment that occurs as the light deepens. The pieces, all irresistibly funny, give shelter to characters whose experiences of transcendence leave them more alienated than consoled. Rosellen, forced to move because her building is slated for demolition, has her last meeting with J.C., the ghost who's entertained (and sometimes tormented) her for the last forty years. Frances, undergoing chemotherapy, discovers a gorgeous wig that might be made from the hair sold by Della in O. Henry's ironic short story "The Gift of the Magi." Bonnie, writing to Peter Gzowski to apprise him of the death of her mother, Gzowski's biggest fan, settles on the best way to disperse her mother's ashes. On Christmas Eve, a man whose name happens to be Leonard Cohen becomes the unwitting plaything of Saint Zita of Lucca and walks through Vancouver's snowy Downtown neighbourhood wearing a wedding gown. These are quirky stories, sometimes twisted, sometimes tender, intended for anyone who's ever been stuck with their wheels spinning at the corner of Pagan and Holy.