Account Login Canada Toll-Free: 1.800.561.1833 SK Toll-Free: 1.877.506.7456 Contact & Locations

Remind Me

An Evening with Candace Savage (Offsite event)

Thursday Oct 03 2019 7:00 pm, Saskatoon, Fédération des Francophones de Saskatoon

Join Candace Savage for the launch of Strangers in the House: A Prairie Story of Bigotry and Belonging. McNally Robinson Booksellers and Greystone Books are pleased to co-present this event at Le Relais Community Hall-Fédération des Francophones de Saskatoon, 308 4th Ave North. 

When researching the first occupant of her home in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, award-winning writer Candace Savage discovers a family more fascinating and heartbreaking than she ever expected. Napoléon Sureau dit Blondin built the house in the 1920s, an era when French-speakers like him were deemed “undesirable” by the political and social elite, who sought to populate the Canadian prairies with WASPs only. In an atmosphere poisoned first by the Orange Order and then by the Ku Klux Klan, Napoléon and his young family adopted anglicized names and did their best to disguise their “foreignness."

In Strangers in the House, Savage scours public records and historical accounts, and interviews several of Napoléon’s descendants, including his youngest son, to reveal a family story marked by challenge and resilience. In the process, she examines a troubling episode in Canadian history, one with surprising relevance today.

Candace Savage is the author of several bestselling, award-winning books. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and, in 1994, was inducted into the Honor Roll of the Rachel Carson Institute, Chatham College, in Pittsburgh. She shares her time between Eastend and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

See:

Strangers in the House

- by Candace Savage

Hardcover $32.95 - Add to Cart
Reader Reward Price: $29.66

A renowned author investigates the dark and shocking history of her prairie house. When researching the first occupant of her Saskatoon home, Candace Savage discovers a family more fascinating and heartbreaking than she expected. Napoléon Sureau dit Blondin built the house in the 1920s, an era when French-speakers like him were deemed "undesirable" by the political and social elite, who sought to populate the Canadian prairies with WASPs only. In an atmosphere poisoned first by the Orange Order and then by the Ku Klux Klan, Napoléon and his young family adopted anglicized names and did their best to disguise their "foreignness." In Strangers in the House, Savage scours public records and historical accounts and interviews several of Napoléon's descendants, including his youngest son, to reveal a family story marked by challenge and resilience. In the process, she examines a troubling episode in Canadian history, one with surprising relevance today.

A Geography of Blood

- by Candace Savage

Trade paperback $22.95 - Add to Cart
Reader Reward Price: $20.66

When Candace Savage and her partner buy a house near the Saskatchewan-Montana border, her naturalist's instinct propels her to explore the area. She takes pleasure in the Wild West setting, discovering hidden back roads, dinosaur skeletons at the discovery center, and fossils in the dust-dry hills. She also revels in her encounters with the land's wild inhabitants -- wolves, cougars and howling coyotes. But as Savage explores further, she uncovers a darker reality -- the little-known history of the Native people who were displaced from their homes, forced onto reserves, and deliberately starved -- and finds that she must reassess her own family's history as prairie sodbusters. Beautifully written and impeccably researched, A Geography of Blood offers both a shocking new version of Western history and an unforgettable portrait of the windswept, shining country of Cypress Hills, a holy place that helps us remember.

Bird Brains

- by Candace Savage

Trade paperback $29.95 - Add to Cart
Reader Reward Price: $26.96

Internationally celebrated nature writer Candace Savage presents the Corvid family-- surprisingly bright, brassy, and colorful birds--in a remarkable collection of full-color, close-up photographs by some of the world's best wildlife photographers. Birds have long been viewed as the archetypal featherbrains--beautiful but dumb. But according to naturalist Candace Savage, "bird brain," as a pejorative expression, should be rendered obsolete by new research on the family of corvids: crows and their close relations.

The ancients who regarded these remarkable birds as oracles, bringers of wisdom, or agents of vengeance were on the right track, for corvids appear to have powers of abstraction, memory, and creativity that put them on a par with many mammals, even higher primates. Bird Brains presents these bright, brassy, and surprisingly colorful birds in a remarkable collection of full-color, close-up photographs by some two dozen of the world's best wildlife photographers.

Savage's lively, authoritative text describes the life and behavior of sixteen representative corvid species that inhabit North America and Europe. Drawing on recent research, she describes birds that recognize each other as individuals, call one another by "name," remember and relocate thousands of hidden food caches, engage in true teamwork and purposeful play, and generally exhibit an extraordinary degree of sophistication.