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Remind Me

An Evening with Arielle Twist

Tuesday Mar 26 2019 7:00 pm, Winnipeg, Grant Park in the Atrium

Winnipeg launch of Disintegrate/Dissociate (Arsenal Pulp Press) featuring a reading and a conversation hosted by Rosanna Deerchild.

In her powerful debut collection of poetry, Arielle Twist unravels the complexities of human relationships after death and metamorphosis. In these spare yet powerful poems, she explores, with both rage and tenderness, the parameters of grief, trauma, displacement, and identity. Weaving together a past made murky by uncertainty and a present which exists in multitudes, Arielle Twist poetically navigates through what it means to be an Indigenous trans woman, discovering the possibilities of a hopeful future and a transcendent, beautiful path to regaining softness.

Arielle Twist is a writer and sex educator originally from George Gordon First Nation, Saskatchewan and now based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. S. She is a Cree, Two-Spirit, trans femme supernova writing to reclaim and harness ancestral magic and memories. Disintegrate/Dissociate is her first poetry book.

Host Rosanna Deerchild has been storytelling for more than 20 years. As the host of CBC Radio One’s Unreserved, she shares Indigenous community, culture, and conversation. As a poet, she has published two books. this is a small northern town won the 2009 Aqua Books Lansdowne Prize for Poetry. calling down the sky is her mother’s Residential School survivor story and has been translated into Cree and French. She is Cree from O-Pipon-Na-Piwan Cree Nation at South Indian Lake in northern Manitoba. Rosanna now lives in her found home of North End, Winnipeg.

See:

Disintegrate/Dissociate

- by Arielle Twist

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In her powerful debut collection of poetry, Arielle Twist unravels the complexities of human relationships after death and metamorphosis. In these spare yet powerful poems, she explores, with both rage and tenderness, the parameters of grief, trauma, displacement, and identity. Weaving together a past made murky by uncertainty and a present which exists in multitudes, Arielle Twist poetically navigates through what it means to be an Indigenous trans woman, discovering the possibilities of a hopeful future and a transcendent, beautiful path to regaining softness.