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Jody Perrun -- Book Launch

Thursday Oct 02 2014 7:00 pm, Winnipeg, Grant Park in the Atrium

Launch of The Patriotic Consensus: Unity, Morale, and the Second World War in Winnipeg (University of Manitoba Press).

When the Second World War broke out, Winnipeg was Canada’s fourth largest city: culturally diverse, with strong class divisions, and a vibrant tradition of political protest. Citizens demonstrated their support for the war effort through their wide commitment to initiatives such as Victory Loan campaigns or calls for voluntary community service. But, given the city’s ethnic and ideological divide, was the Second World War a unifying event for Winnipeg residents?

In The Patriotic Consensus, Jody Perrun explores the wartime experience of ordinary Winnipeggers through their responses to recruiting, the treatment of minorities, and the adjustments made necessary by family separation. With nearly one in ten Canadians in uniform, the war touched everyone’s lives in some way. In Winnipeg, Perrun argues, unity was enhanced by shared hardships and the effectiveness of both official and unofficial information management.

Jody Perrun teaches history at the University of Winnipeg, the University of Manitoba, and the Royal Military College of Canada, specializing in the Second World War, post-Confederation Canada, and the Holocaust.

See:

The Patriotic Consensus

- by Jody Perrun

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When the Second World War broke out, Winnipeg was Canada's fourth-largest city, home to strong class and ethnic divisions, and marked by a vibrant tradition of political protest. Citizens demonstrated their support for the war effort through their wide commitment to initiatives such as Victory Loan campaigns or calls for voluntary community service. But given Winnipeg's diversity, was the Second World War a unifying event for Winnipeg residents? In The Patriotic Consensus, Jody Perrun explores the wartime experience of ordinary Winnipeggers through their responses to recruiting, the treatment of minorities, and the adjustments made necessary by family separation.