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Give and Take by Elly Swartz (from a Two Thumbs Up reviewer)

Sunday, Mar 01, 2020 at 2:05pm

Family has always been important to twelve-year-old Maggie: a trapshooter, she is coached by her dad and cheered on by her mom. But her grandmother's recent death leaves a giant hole in Maggie's life, one which she begins to fill with an assortment of things: candy wrappers, pieces of tassel from Nana's favorite scarf, milk cartons, sticks . . . all stuffed in cardboard boxes under her bed. Then her parents decide to take in a foster infant. But anxiety over the new baby's departure only worsens Maggie's hoarding, and soon she finds herself taking and taking until she spirals out of control. Ultimately, with some help from family, friends, and experts, Maggie learns that sometimes love means letting go.

I personally liked the book Give and Take because the main character Maggie is going through a lot of things and she has to find a way to deal with her emotions. Maggie's Nana died one year ago which really affects her throughout the story. Maggie has also started collecting little things like straws and rocks. Maggie then has to go to therapy because she has a fear that if she throws anything away she will loose the memory that comes with the item. I wish that I could meet Maggie because she seems like a really good friend, but also someone that makes good decisions. I think someone who's around the age of 10 would really enjoy this book. 

- Ilsa, a Two Thumbs Up reviewer

Categories: Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Two Thumbs Up Kids

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Give and Take

- by Elly Shwartz

Children's hardcover $22.99 - Add to Cart
Reader Reward Price: $20.69

Elly Swartz's Give and Take is a touching middle grade novel about family, friendship, and learning when to let go.

Family has always been important to twelve-year-old Maggie: a trapshooter, she is coached by her dad and cheered on by her mom. But her grandmother's recent death leaves a giant hole in Maggie's life, one which she begins to fill with an assortment of things: candy wrappers, pieces of tassel from Nana's favorite scarf, milk cartons, sticks . . . all stuffed in cardboard boxes under her bed.

Then her parents decide to take in a foster infant. But anxiety over the new baby's departure only worsens Maggie's hoarding, and soon she finds herself taking and taking until she spirals out of control. Ultimately, with some help from family, friends, and experts, Maggie learns that sometimes love means letting go.

This title has Common Core connections.