Account Login Canada Toll-Free: 1.800.561.1833 SK Toll-Free: 1.877.506.7456 Contact & Locations

Remind Me

An Evening with Thomas King with guest host Ken Coates (In Conversation)

Tuesday Jan 30 2018 7:00 pm, Saskatoon, Travel Alcove

Join us for an evening with celebrated author Thomas King with guest host Ken Coates.

Since its publication in 2012, The Inconvenient Indian has become an award-winning bestseller and a modern classic. In its pages, Thomas King tells the curiously circular tale of the relationship between non-Native and Indigenous people in the centuries since the two first encountered each other. This new, provocatively illustrated edition matches essential visuals to the book's urgent words, and in so doing deepens and expands King's message. With more than 150 images—from artwork, photographs, advertisements and archival documents to contemporary representations of Native peoples by Native peoples, including some by King himself—this unforgettable volume vividly shows how "Indians" have been seen, understood, propagandized, represented and reinvented in North America.

Thomas King is one of Canada's premier intellectuals. For the past five decades, he has worked as an activist for Native causes and administrator of Native programs, and has taught Native literature and history at universities in the United States and Canada. He is the author of bestselling non-fiction, short stories and novels, including The Back of the Turtle; Medicine River; Green Grass, Running Water; and Truth and Bright Water. He has received numerous awards and honours, including the National Aboriginal Achievement Award, the Governor General's Literary Award for Fiction, the RBC Taylor Prize, British Columbia's National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction, the Trillium Award, and the Order of Canada. He lives in Guelph, Ontario.

Ken Coates is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation in the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy. He is also the Macdonald-Laurier Institute's Senior Policy Fellow in Aboriginal and Northern Canadian Issues.

He has served at universities across Canada (UNBC, UNB and Waterloo) and at the University of Waikato (New Zealand), an institution known internationally for its work on Indigenous affairs. He has also worked as a consultant for Indigenous groups and governments in Canada, New Zealand, and Australia as well as for the United Nations, companies, and think tanks. Ken has also served as the past president of the Japan Studies Association of Canada, and in November was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada.