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A Line in the Dark by Malinda Lo (from a Two Thumbs Up reviewer)

by McNally Robinson - Friday, Dec 29, 2017 at 10:55am

Jess Wong is Angie Redmond’s best friend. And that’s the most important thing, even if Angie can’t see how Jess truly feels. Being the girl no one quite notices is OK with Jess anyway. If nobody notices her, she’s free to watch everyone else. But when Angie begins to fall for Margot Adams, a girl from the nearby boarding school, Jess can see it coming a mile away. Suddenly her powers of observation are more a curse than a gift. As Angie drags Jess further into Margot’s circle, Jess discovers more than her friend’s growing crush. Secrets and cruelty lie just beneath the carefree surface of this world of wealth and privilege, and when they come out, Jess knows Angie won’t be able to handle the consequences.

Jess and Angie have a weird relationship. Realistic, but still weird. Jess and Angie understand each other quite well but Jess is very possessive. She needs to know what Angie is doing at all hours and with who. Many side characters accuse Jess of stalking her, which is so OBVIOUSLY true, but somehow Angie doesn't see it that way. This is a definite fault of hers, and it adds a creepy effect to the novel. The plot line, on the other hand, is almost impeccable. Every event that occurs is significant in some way to the story's ending. No scenes are added just to lengthen the novel. This is a nice touch; it greats straight to the point. At Chapter 37, the author switches the point of view. It starts off in first person, through Jessica's eyes, and then it suddenly becomes third person. If this was deliberate, I might have a theory why she did it, but it was extremely abrupt. I had to flip through the pages to see what was going on. After the switch, the rest of the novel was kind of bland, like it was missing something. There was a certain quality, or complexity even to A Line In the Dark when it was in first person perspective and that quality did not follow through to the end of the novel. If Malinda Lo wanted to keep things mysterious by using this all-knowing point of view , she should've just wrote the entire text this way. Overall I'd rate this as a 7/10 and would recommend it to contemporary/semi-thriller lovers.

- Lauren, a Two Thumbs Up reviewer

Categories: Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Two Thumbs Up

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A Line in the Dark

- Young adult hardcover

by Malinda Lo - $23.99 - Add to Cart

"A twisty, dark psychological thriller that will leave you guessing til the very end."--Teen Vogue"[A] riveting read..."--NPRThe line between best friend and something more is a line always crossed in the dark.   Jess Wong is Angie Redmond's best friend. And that's the most important thing, even if Angie can't see how Jess truly feels. Being the girl no one quite notices is OK with Jess anyway. If nobody notices her, she's free to watch everyone else. But when Angie begins to fall for Margot Adams, a girl from the nearby boarding school, Jess can see it coming a mile away. Suddenly her powers of observation are more a curse than a gift.   As Angie drags Jess further into Margot's circle, Jess discovers more than her friend's growing crush. Secrets and cruelty lie just beneath the carefree surface of this world of wealth and privilege, and when they come out, Jess knows Angie won't be able to handle the consequences.   When the inevitable darkness finally descends, Angie will need her best friend.                                 "It doesn't even matter that she probably doesn't understand how much she means to me. It's purer this way. She can take whatever she wants from me, whenever she wants it, because I'm her best friend."   A Line in the Dark is a story of love, loyalty, and murder.? "Mesmerizing."--Kirkus, starred review.