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Michael Redhill wins the 2017 Giller Prize

by Tyler Vitt - Tuesday, Nov 21, 2017 at 4:46pm

Michael Redhill has won this year's Scotiabank Giller Prize for his novel, Bellevue Square, a darkly comic tale about a woman who fears for her sanity and her life when she learns that her doppelganger has appeared in a local park — Toronto's Bellevue Square.

The Giller Prize is Canada's richest literary award, with $100,000 given to the winner and $10,000 to each of the finalists, and is awarded annually to the best Canadian novel or short story collection published in English. The award was founded by Toronto businessman Jack Rabinovitch, who named the prize in honour of his wife, the late literary journalist Doris Giller.

The other shortlisted authors for the 2017 prize were Rachel Cusk for her novel Transit; Ed O'Loughlin for his novel Minds of Winter; Eden Robinson for her novel Son of a Trickster; and Michelle Winters for her novel I am a Truck.

So congratulations, Mr. Redhill! For more details about the 2017 Giller Prize, visit their website.

Categories: Awards, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Literature

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Bellevue Square

- Hardcover

by Michael Redhill - $32.00 - Add to Cart

WINNER OF THE 2017 SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE A darkly comic literary thriller about a woman who fears for her sanity and then her life when she learns that her doppelganger has appeared in a local park. Jean Mason has a doppelganger. She's never seen her, but others swear they have. Apparently, her identical twin hangs out in Kensington Market, where she sometimes buys churros and drags an empty shopping cart down the streets, like she's looking for something to put in it. Jean's a grown woman with a husband and two kids, as well as a thriving bookstore in downtown Toronto, and she doesn't rattle easily--not like she used to. But after two customers insist they've seen her double, Jean decides to investigate. She begins at the crossroads of Kensington Market: a city park called Bellevue Square. Although she sees no one who looks like her, it only takes a few visits to the park for her to become obsessed with the possibility of encountering her twin in the flesh. With the aid of a small army of locals who hang around in the park, she expands her surveillance, making it known she'll pay for information or sightings. A peculiar collection of drug addicts, scam artists, philanthropists, philosophers and vagrants the regulars of Bellevue Square are eager to contribute to Jean's investigation. But when some of them start disappearing, she fears her alleged double has a sinister agenda. Unless Jean stops her, she and everyone she cares about will face a fate much stranger than death.